Annual Stem Cell Soiree

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The Neural Stem Cell Institute hosted the 5th Annual Stem Cell Soiree on Friday, September 30, 2016 at 90 State Street in Albany, NY.

The Master of Ceremonies was WNYT Health Reporter, Benita Zahn. Delicious food and beverages provided by the extraordinary Mazzone Catering and entertainment by The Audiostars was thoroughly enjoyed.

Please join us next year for this meaningful and exciting evening in support of our research. Hear how our ongoing scientific work could impact the lives of individuals and families in our community and all over the world who are suffering from incurable nervous system disease. Details are being arranged currently. 

If you are interested in volunteering for the 2017 Soiree Planning Committee, contact Suzanne Kawola: suzannekawola@neiralsci.org or 518.694.8188 x242

 

5th Annual Stem Cell Soiree – September 30th, 2016

Please join us for this meaningful and exciting evening in support of our research. Hear how our ongoing scientific work could impact the lives of individuals and families in our community and all over the world who are suffering from incurable nervous system disease. Stem Cell Soiree Save the Date_Online

NSCI Scientific Director Dr. Sally Temple is elected President of the International Society for Stem Cell Research

NSCI Scientific Director Dr. Sally Temple is elected President of theInternational Society for Stem Cell Research International Society for Stem Cell Research for Stem Cell Research 

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RENSSELAER N.Y., July 20, 2016 –Scientific Director and Co-founder of the Neural Stem Cell Institute, Dr. Sally Temple, is now President of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), the preeminent organization of stem cell scientists. Dr. Temple will lead ISSCR activities and programs that promote outstanding basic, translational and clinical stem cell research.
Dr. Temple: “It is a sincere honor to have the opportunity to serve as president of ISSCR and preside over the annual meeting in Boston, 14-17th June 2017. The society is committed to promoting the highest standards in stem cell research and its application for safe and effective therapies addressing many diseases, including those for which no treatments are currently available. Stem cell research has the potential to revolutionize medicine and benefit millions of patients world-wide”.

From the ISSCR website: “The International Society for Stem Cell Research is an independent, nonprofit organization established to promote and foster the exchange and dissemination of information and ideas relating to stem cells, to encourage the general field of research involving stem cells and to promote professional and public education in all areas of stem cell research and application. ISSCR has nearly 4,000 members in more than 55 countries. As an organization focused on bringing together all members of the stem cell community, we are proud that our membership is led by some of the most prominent and respected scientists from around the globe.”

About NSCI: NSCI, the first independent, non-profit stem cell research institute in the United States, is a unique research organization that produces leading stem cell science with the goal of developing novel therapies for diseases of the retina, brain and spinal cord. NSCI has a team of over 30 researchers focused on bringing impactful therapies to patients.

MEDIA CONTACT: Suzanne Kawola (518) 694-8188 x242

NSCI at ARVO: What Does it Take to Develop a Stem Cell Therapy for the Retina?

Stern_NSCITemple_NSCINSCI co-founders Dr. Sally Temple and Dr. Jeffrey Stern were recognized for their outstanding presentations at the Association for Research and Ophthalmology (ARVO) Annual Meeting earlier this month:

While there were seven outstanding stem-cell presentations during the summit, I want to highlight two that were particularly intriguing. 

Jeffrey Stern, M.D., Ph.D., co-founder of the Neural Stem Cell Institute (NSCI), discussed how the human retina has its own resident stem cells, which his group is working to harness as a therapy for diseases like AMD. In AMD, the disease causes degeneration of supportive cells known as retinal pigment epithelium, or RPE. When RPE are lost, the photoreceptors, the cells that make vision possible, die off as well, and central vision is lost.

Along with his wife and NSCI co-founder, Sally Temple, Ph.D., Stern is leading an effort to coax dormant stem cells in the patient’s retina to become new RPE. While it isn’t as far along as other RPE-replacement therapies, some of which are in early clinical trials, the NSCI “grow your own” approach would avoid many of the issues—including immune-system reactions, manufacturing and transplantation—associated with other stem-cell therapies. 

Read the entire review, by Ben Shaberman, entitled: What Does it Take to Develop a Stem-Cell Therapy for the Retina? here.

Temple and NSCI featured in Review of Opthalmology

Temple_NSCIIn the News: Dr. Temple was recently featured in the Review of Ophthalmology for her work with human retinal epithelium cells and her efforts to combat eye disease:

Stem Cells from the RPE
One of the most interesting stem-cell-related developments in the past decade has been the realization that different organs contain cells that are partly specialized for use exclusively in that tissue, but still qualify as stem cells because their final cell type is not yet determined. Following that premise, researchers are now working with stem cells that are found in the RPE, as well as stem cells taken from the central nervous system, both of which are showing unique promise.

Researchers at the Neural Stem Cell Institute in Rensselaer, N.Y., have been working with the stem cells found in the retina. These cells are innately programmed to produce RPE cells (although they sometimes do produce other cells, possibly accounting for certain retinal disease conditions). Sally Temple, PhD, co-founder and scientific director of the institute, and president-elect of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, heads the group. They are currently culturing human RPE stem cells and transplanting them into diseased retinas in an attempt to produce anatomic and visual rescue.

“We now have really strong efficacy data for this procedure in an animal model using the Royal College of Surgeons rat,” says Dr. Temple. “In that model the RPE is dysfunctional and the photoreceptors die. We’ve shown that we can rescue photoreceptors and vision in that animal by implanting adult RPE stem cells. We’ve followed these animals for six months to date, and the effect is ongoing; the treated animals are continuing to see while the untreated controls are going blind.”

To read the entire article go here.